17 Nov

Focus group anecdote

The story is told of a focus group for a new $100 electronic gadget. The response in the focus group was fabulous, people all talked about the features of the new device with excitement.

At the end of the session, the moderator said, “thanks for coming. As our gift to you, you can have your choice of the device or $25.”

Everyone took the cash.

(via tomwhitwell)

16 Aug

On ette

If you track this process over a long enough time-period, you’ll find plenty of cases where a word’s meaning has shifted from negative to positive, or vice-versa. For instance, sophisticated was once an insult (meaning ‘dishonest, deceitful’), and complacent was once a compliment (meaning ‘pleasant, obliging’).

Could –ette be making the same kind of journey? It’s not inconceivable, but on balance I don’t think so. Present-day English speakers may not make the old connection with cheap imitation materials, because most of those words have fallen out of use. But –ette remains common in its diminutive sense, so there’s still a basis for younger speakers to deduce that female-referring terms of the form X + ette imply ‘little X’ as well as ‘female X’—and potentially to find that insulting, just as feminists of my generation did.

https://debuk.wordpress.com/2015/08/16/ette-ymology

03 Aug

Animation roughs

jbaxteranimator:

Benedict puts on a sweater, in what apparently has become an ongoing series of CalArts lecture tests featuring animals messing around with clothes! This one was fun to do!

Have become mildly obsessed with these amazing hand-drawn animation test samples.

12 Jul

Debbie Cameron

Men’s greater success in the workplace is largely a product of their privileged status as men: just imitating their behaviour won’t give women their status. Yet here we are in the second decade of the 21st century, recycling the same old advice.

Debbie Cameron in Just don’t do it on language: a feminist guide. (via blech)