A Book Apart: Progressive Web Apps

This time last year, I was at Chrome Dev Summit. I ran into Jason Grigsby, who I am always glad to chat with. He mentioned, slightly off-hand, that he was writing a new book about Progressive Web Apps and jokingly suggested that I would be a good person to contribute to a foreword.

Well. He wasn’t joking.

His wonderful new book is out now, published by A Book Apart.

Picture of the PWA book
A real book made of trees!

The foreword is written by myself and Alex, and we mean every word we say in it. We couldn’t be happier with how Jason’s book turned out and it’s really the only book you need if you want to understand why, and how, you should be building PWAs.

I’m very thankful for his kindness and the opportunity to contribute in a tiny way to his amazing work.

On ette

If you track this process over a long enough time-period, you’ll find plenty of cases where a word’s meaning has shifted from negative to positive, or vice-versa. For instance, sophisticated was once an insult (meaning ‘dishonest, deceitful’), and complacent was once a compliment (meaning ‘pleasant, obliging’).

Could –ette be making the same kind of journey? It’s not inconceivable, but on balance I don’t think so. Present-day English speakers may not make the old connection with cheap imitation materials, because most of those words have fallen out of use. But –ette remains common in its diminutive sense, so there’s still a basis for younger speakers to deduce that female-referring terms of the form X + ette imply ‘little X’ as well as ‘female X’—and potentially to find that insulting, just as feminists of my generation did.

https://debuk.wordpress.com/2015/08/16/ette-ymology

Back the Pastry Box Book

As I mentioned, I wrote for the Pastry Box Project for all of 2012.

Now, it’s hopefully going to be printed in dead tree form with the royalties going to the Red Cross. That’s kind of nice, as are many of the fancier offerings at the higher tiers (hand press? illustrations? all sorts!).

So, if you’re a fan of paper and of the folks that wrote last year, the details are all available here.

It’s being crowd sourced, so it’ll only be as successful as your interest allows. That’s how the internet works now, or something.

24ways 2010

So, I wrote a little article for this year’s 24ways on documentation. It’s based heavily on the processes we used to develop BBC Glow, so I hope someone finds it useful.

If you’re feeling charitable, this year you can buy my article and the other brilliant 23 as an annual from Five Simple Steps: 24ways 2010 Annual, with the proceeds going to UNICEF. Yay!